CANADEAN BEVERAGE PACKAGING 2014, BRUSSELS

Smoothie brand Froosh warns of ‘social washing’ on supply chain sustainability

By Ben BOUCKLEY contact

- Last updated on GMT

Anna Hagemann-Rise, group communications & CSR manager, pictured here at one of Froosh's fruit farms in Malawi. In Brussels she urged 'trade not aid' developing countries
Anna Hagemann-Rise, group communications & CSR manager, pictured here at one of Froosh's fruit farms in Malawi. In Brussels she urged 'trade not aid' developing countries

Related tags: Supply chain, Sustainability

Scandinavia’s top-selling smoothie manufacturer Froosh has called for ‘trade not aid’ in developing countries and insists beverage brands should do more to understand their supply chains.

Anna Hagemann-Rise, group communications & CSR manager, Froosh, told BeverageDaily.com: “Traceability in terms of the supply chain is a growing trend. And it feels like most of the bigger companies, at least, need a traceability supply chain focus, because this is what the consumers want. This is a good thing.

“But to my mind – a lot of this is just social washing. You try to wash your hands and might say that you’re doing something and not just walking the walk. We need to look at the origin of our products, get back to the roots, and before talking about it understand it.”

Hagemann-Rise was speaking on the margins of the Canadean Beverage Packaging 2014 event in Brussels this week, and she said Froosh had a close relationship with fruit growers in regions like Africa, where most of our bananas and mangoes come from.

“Given the fact that 50% of the fruit in our smoothies right now comes from developing countries, we have a specific interest in visiting these countries,”​ she said.

“We bring consumers, customer and the media to these farms – and they have an amazing impact on sustainable development in these local and very rural communities,”​ she added.

“What we see when we [Froosh] get there is that a lot of NGOs there give out handouts and development aid. But unfortunately is just not the right way to go. It doesn’t work on the ground,”​ she added, noting that money disappears due to corruption or is spent on arms.

“But what does work is buying goods from the fruit farms and making it easier for them to export their goods to America and the EU. So we’re trying to fight trade barriers on behalf of developing countries, so to speak,”​ Hagemann-Rise said.

Related news

Show more

Related products

show more

Our approach to stevia sustainability

Our approach to stevia sustainability

Cargill | 30-Jul-2020 | Product Presentation

As consumers demand greater clarity around the foods they eat, sustainable production is often a key part of a product's story. Cargill stevia leaf...

Delivering optimal sweetness with stevia

Delivering optimal sweetness with stevia

Cargill | 28-Jul-2020 | Product Presentation

Sugar is high on consumers' radar these days…but for many, artificial sweeteners no longer fit the bill. Plant-based, zero-calorie stevia fills the...

Bestevia® Taste Solutions for Europe: Beverages

Bestevia® Taste Solutions for Europe: Beverages

SweeGen Inc. | 21-Jul-2020 | Product Brochure

Reformulating beverages with less sugar and no artificial sweeteners is key to reaching today’s label conscious consumers. Our Bestevia® Taste Solutions...

Related suppliers

Follow us

Products

View more

Webinars