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Latest beverage research on soft drinks, sweeteners, alcohol and energy drinks

R&D

Do diet sodas spur weight gain or help lessen America's obesity epidemic? Does moderate wine consumption help the kidneys? Do thinking men prefer Pepsi to Coke? Stay up to date with all the latest beverage research in this section of BeverageDaily.com.

Studies raise questions over sugar, caffeine, and children's intake of energy drinks

Two new studies have suggested that many children and adolescents consuming energy drinks get too much caffeine, while suggesting the level of sugar and caffeinated drinks can lead to different...

Soft drinks linked to depressive symptoms among Chinese adults: Study

Higher consumption of soft drinks correlates with higher prevalence of depressive symptoms, according to a cross-sectional study of the Chinese adult population.

White tea packs antioxidant punch against colon cancer: Study

White tea could slow the spread of colon cancer cells thanks to its antioxidant properties, claim researchers.

Scientists shine light on ‘aerated’ dairy drink with satiety potential

Nottingham University scientists claim to have shone new light on the intra-gastric behaviour of ‘aerated’ drinks with enhanced satiating properties that they say could be used to fight obesity.

'Situational appropriateness' of beer influenced by familiarity: Study

Familiar beer brands are considered more appropriate for refreshment or sporting events, while less recognizable options are better suited for "special occasions," consumer research suggests.

Coffee silverskin beverages have weight management potential: Study

Beverages made with with coffee silverskin - a major by-product of the coffee roasting process - have potential in weight management, Spanish research suggests.

Lung, breast and ovarian cancer risk lower among lactose intolerant: Study

Lactose intolerant individuals have a decreased risk of developing lung, breast and ovarian cancers, fresh Swedish findings suggest.

Australia

Grapes (and wine drinkers) owe a debt to 30m-year-old viruses

Researchers in Queensland have been toasting the prehistoric viruses that they’ve found are partly responsible for the genetic make-up of modern-day grapes.

News in brief

Shipwrecked beer recreated by scientists

A 170-year old beer found in a shipwreck is to be recreated by the Finnish-based brewery Stallhagen and the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.

Green tea may lower blood pressure - but only for non-smokers

Green tea, but not black tea, may lower blood pressure, but this effect is cancelled out by smoking, according to a five-year study in China.

Alcohol-free beer 'improved' with aromas from regular beer: Study

Spanish researchers claim to have improved the taste of low and non-alcoholic beer by adding aromatic compounds recovered from regular beer.

CANADEAN BEVERAGE PACKAGING 2014, BRUSSELS

SAB Miller promises ’next generation’ PET beer bottles...in around five years

SAB Miller says research to date on a new type of PET to keep bottled beer fresher for longer 'looks promising', but the brewer says commercialization of the technology is...

Green tea extract may boost short term memory: Pilot study data

Extracts from green tea may boost a range of cognitive functions, with particular benefits observed for short term memory, report researchers from Japan.

Grapefruit juice may block weight gain from high-fat diet: Mouse data

Consumption of grapefruit juice may block weight gain from a high-fat diet by improving metabolic markers, according to research in mice.

Down in 1 (or 2 or 3): Resealable energy drink newbie encourages ‘responsible’ consumption

Grenade Energy says it is taking a leaf out of the confectionery industry’s book by offering the option of controlled portion cans.

Down in 1 (or 2 or 3): Resealable energy drink newbie encourages ‘responsible’ consumption

Grenade Energy says it is taking a leaf out of the confectionery industry’s book by offering the option of controlled portion cans.

San Francisco study associates sugar-sweetened soda with cell aging

University of California researchers have warned that regular sugar-sweetened soda drinking could increase the risk of disease development and accelerate cellular aging.

STUDY COULD HELP IDENTIFY WHO SHOULD DRINK MORE OR LESS

Harvard study suggests we seek maximum caffeine bang from coffee buck

A high-profile US meta study suggests people naturally tailor their coffee intake to experience caffeine’s optimal effects, while genetic factors linked to higher consumption likely increase coffee metabolism.

Montmorency tart cherry shows gout potential: Study

Evidence that Montmorency tart cherry could be useful in managing gouty arthritis and other inflammatory conditions is mounting, as a new study shows that tart cherry concentrate lowers uric acid...

Honeysuckle tea to fight flu? Chinese claim ‘extremely novel finding’

Chinese scientists are claiming an ‘extremely novel finding’ after mice fought off several different types of flu when fed a honeysuckle tisane.

Australia - feature

Young binge drinkers risk compounding mental health issues

Research has shown that binge drinking by youngsters with existing mental health issues can risk exacerbating their condition.

Boulder startup aims to turn waste CO2 from breweries into omega-3 oils

A Boulder start-up aims to turn a waste stream from one value-added product—beer—into another: algal omega-3 oils.

Energy drinks increase sports performance – and insomnia and nervousness, says study

Energy drink consumption improves sports performance by 3%–7%, but also increases insomnia, nervousness and the level of stimulation after a competition, according a study.

Partnership with 3Dom Filaments marks first step into 3D printing industry

Biome Bioplastics creates biodegradeable plastic with higher 3D print speeds

Biome Bioplastics has launched Biome3D, a biodegradable plastic made from plant starches for the 3D printing industry.

'Fungi cocktail' turns winery waste into biofuels

Winery waste could be converted into compounds with a value as biofuels or medicines, according to Australian researchers.